Potential Defense Evasion via PRoot

Identifies the execution of the PRoot utility, an open-source tool for user-space implementation of chroot, mount --bind, and binfmt_misc. Adversaries can leverage an open-source tool PRoot to expand the scope of their operations to multiple Linux distributions and simplify their necessary efforts. In a normal threat scenario, the scope of an attack is limited by the varying configurations of each Linux distribution. With PRoot, it provides an attacker with a consistent operational environment across different Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu, Fedora, and Alpine. PRoot also provides emulation capabilities that allow for malware built on other architectures, such as ARM, to be run.The post-exploitation technique called bring your own filesystem (BYOF), can be used by the threat actors to execute malicious payload or elevate privileges or perform network scans or orchestrate another attack on the environment. Although PRoot was originally not developed with malicious intent it can be easily tuned to work for one.

Elastic rule (View on GitHub)

 1[metadata]
 2creation_date = "2023/03/07"
 3integration = ["endpoint"]
 4maturity = "production"
 5min_stack_comments = "New fields added: required_fields, related_integrations, setup"
 6min_stack_version = "8.3.0"
 7updated_date = "2024/02/20"
 8
 9[rule]
10author = ["Elastic"]
11description = """
12Identifies the execution of the PRoot utility, an open-source tool for user-space implementation of
13chroot, mount --bind, and binfmt_misc. Adversaries can leverage an open-source tool PRoot
14to expand the scope of their operations to multiple Linux distributions and simplify their necessary efforts.
15In a normal threat scenario, the scope of an attack is limited by the varying configurations of each Linux distribution.
16With PRoot, it provides an attacker with a consistent operational environment across different Linux distributions,
17such as Ubuntu, Fedora, and Alpine. PRoot also provides emulation capabilities that allow for malware built on other
18architectures, such as ARM, to be run.The post-exploitation technique called bring your own filesystem (BYOF),
19can be used by the threat actors to execute malicious payload or elevate privileges or perform network scans or
20orchestrate another attack on the environment. Although PRoot was originally not developed with malicious intent
21it can be easily tuned to work for one.
22"""
23from = "now-9m"
24index = ["logs-endpoint.events.*", "endgame-*"]
25language = "eql"
26license = "Elastic License v2"
27name = "Potential Defense Evasion via PRoot"
28references = [
29    "https://proot-me.github.io/",
30]
31risk_score = 47
32rule_id = "5c9ec990-37fa-4d5c-abfc-8d432f3dedd0"
33setup = """
34
35This rule requires data coming in from Elastic Defend.
36
37### Elastic Defend Integration Setup
38Elastic Defend is integrated into the Elastic Agent using Fleet. Upon configuration, the integration allows the Elastic Agent to monitor events on your host and send data to the Elastic Security app.
39
40#### Prerequisite Requirements:
41- Fleet is required for Elastic Defend.
42- To configure Fleet Server refer to the [documentation](https://www.elastic.co/guide/en/fleet/current/fleet-server.html).
43
44#### The following steps should be executed in order to add the Elastic Defend integration on a Linux System:
45- Go to the Kibana home page and click "Add integrations".
46- In the query bar, search for "Elastic Defend" and select the integration to see more details about it.
47- Click "Add Elastic Defend".
48- Configure the integration name and optionally add a description.
49- Select the type of environment you want to protect, either "Traditional Endpoints" or "Cloud Workloads".
50- Select a configuration preset. Each preset comes with different default settings for Elastic Agent, you can further customize these later by configuring the Elastic Defend integration policy. [Helper guide](https://www.elastic.co/guide/en/security/current/configure-endpoint-integration-policy.html).
51- We suggest selecting "Complete EDR (Endpoint Detection and Response)" as a configuration setting, that provides "All events; all preventions"
52- Enter a name for the agent policy in "New agent policy name". If other agent policies already exist, you can click the "Existing hosts" tab and select an existing policy instead.
53For more details on Elastic Agent configuration settings, refer to the [helper guide](https://www.elastic.co/guide/en/fleet/8.10/agent-policy.html).
54- Click "Save and Continue".
55- To complete the integration, select "Add Elastic Agent to your hosts" and continue to the next section to install the Elastic Agent on your hosts.
56For more details on Elastic Defend refer to the [helper guide](https://www.elastic.co/guide/en/security/current/install-endpoint.html).
57
58"""
59severity = "medium"
60tags = [
61        "Domain: Endpoint",
62        "OS: Linux",
63        "Use Case: Threat Detection",
64        "Tactic: Defense Evasion",
65        "Data Source: Elastic Defend",
66        "Data Source: Elastic Endgame"
67        ]
68timestamp_override = "event.ingested"
69type = "eql"
70query = '''
71process where host.os.type == "linux" and event.action in ("exec", "exec_event") and process.parent.name == "proot"
72'''
73
74[[rule.threat]]
75framework = "MITRE ATT&CK"
76
77[[rule.threat.technique]]
78id = "T1211"
79name = "Exploitation for Defense Evasion"
80reference = "https://attack.mitre.org/techniques/T1211/"
81
82[rule.threat.tactic]
83id = "TA0005"
84name = "Defense Evasion"
85reference = "https://attack.mitre.org/tactics/TA0005/"

References

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